glass house mountains

Awe-inspiring landscape

glass house mountains

Awe-inspiring landscape

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The iconic chain of steep-sided volcanic plugs showcased from many vantage points of the Sunshine Coast, were named the Glass House Mountains by Lt. James Cook on Thursday 17th May 1770, because they reminded him of the glass furnace kilns in his native Yorkshire; its Aboriginal name is daki comon -meaning stone standing up. 



Extending from Mount Coochin in the north to Mount Beerburrum in the south and encompassing Mount Beerwah in the west; they are not only a spectacular site steeped in natural and spiritual history, in recent years they have also become a popular place to climb, bringing tourists to the area from far and wide.



Historically, timber cutting, pineapple farming and citrus orchards were key economic drivers of this small but bustling township.  Over time, whilst pineapple farms continue to operate in the district, it has also evolved into a delightful family-friendly community, on the rail line to Brisbane, with amenities including primary school, IGA, local shops/cafes, sports complex, tavern, and parks/playgrounds.



In recent years there have been several residential subdivisions to the west of the town, attracting families seeking country-style living on larger blocks, with house prices generally more affordable than east of the highway. 



A quiet community it has still retained its quaint, friendly atmosphere despite the hordes of visitors descending on its national parks to bush walk and mountain climb on weekends; it’s desirability as a place to anchor down and call home is certainly on the rise.